Spring Daffodils

Posted on Category:still life

Spring Daffodils
14″ x 11″ oil on panel

SOLD

My garden is overflowing with these beauties. We are finally getting spring weather so they are really singing.

I thought I’d paint a reminder of this warm and sunny day when the snows fly again.

February Newsletter

Posted on Category:still life

Everything’s Coming Up Roses

Every New Year I meditate on the fresh new page of my life. What will it hold? How will I grow? Where will I learn? Who from? What topics?

January kept me busy with daily work in the studio. My daily practice helps me grow as an artist. My work did result in several completed paintings.
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Valentines gifts to be cherished longer than bouquets of florists roses.
The paintings are each 8”x10” oil on panel. Priced at $295 or 2 for $500.

Call me at 215 262-2330 or Email me at [email protected] Checks accepted.

I’ll wrap your paintings and mail them to you for your walls.10% of all sales are donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.
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Continue Covid – 19 mask wearing and social distancing. Stay Safe!

January – 2022 BOGO Clearance Sale

Posted on Category:still life
Small Rose Logo

Thank heaven 2021 is behind us! I’m turning the page to a new year. I’m also turning the page into my new life. What will it hold> I’m loving my studio and the paintings that welcome me each morning. Painting is my refuge.

My mission is to use my talents and gifts for good.

This means 10% of all sales are donated to the Alzheimer’s Association. Also I donate paintings to be auctioned for charitable causes. Tell me how we can work together to support your favorite cause.

Learning from skilled teachers has always been my favorite experience. For the holidays, my family gave me lessons from new instructors. I have visions of new colors, new subjects, new flowers.

Today I begin daily work in the studio. It’s not likely to result in completed paintings each day. But at least daily practice will help me grow as an artist, enable me to better see what works and what doesn’t yet.

I’m ready to create new paintings to refill my studio. But first I need to empty my display wall, hence the:

2020 Studio Clearance photo

The wall where I display my current work is full and needs to get cleared. Please help. Take a couple of these to your home.

Small paintings look great alone or in groups. I’ve priced these to make them easy to afford.

🙂 Karlene

Who Else Wants Less Stress While Caring for our Loved One?

Posted on Category:still life
Farm and Fields scaled

September 2020

I know I did. Here’s a ‘short’ synopsis of our Alzheimer’s journey:

  • John was initially diagnosed with Mild Cognitive Impairment. That’s an euphemism for he couldn’t remember much, be it where he put the keys or that we had a dinner date with good friends. We still had a really good life on the whole. These minor glitches didn’t get in the way of too much. But he was worried enough about it that he made arrangements to see a Cognitive Neurologist (I’ve learned all sorts of new medical terminology along the way).
  • By the following year his memory had deteriorated and out regular doctor suggested that he might go to see a Neurologist who specializes in memory issues (read Alzheimer’s and all sorts of other Dementias). John was rather pleased when he learned that this doctor also ran Clinical Trials for potential new medications. His comment tells a lot about who he is/was, “If the medication doesn’t help me, at least it will let the researchers know they’ll need to look in another direction.”
  • No, the Trials did not help John’s condition. But one of them did give him a special PET scan at no cost. That test showed that his brain was already filled with Amyloid Protein Plaques. These, in my terms, sort of gunk up the works. The neurons are not able to move the signals appropriately. So he started to use the wrong words or not being able to find the words at all. His language centers are directly impacted by these plaques.
  • Another year or two went by. The slowness of his deterioration prevented me from really seeing how much he had lost. He was still able to enjoy working in the garden. I stayed in the air conditioned apartment and knit while he pulled the weeds. Until one day I looked up and he was no longer in the garden. Then I went on the quest to find him. How scary is that!?! Luckily one of our neighbors spotted him and led him home.
  • Shortly after that the incontinence began. It was time for him to move into Assisted Living. Being separated was difficult. But we both recognized that it was time, or rather that it was actually late. Luckily he settled in and was quite comfortable.
  • We’ve been managing well enough or the last two years. Then Covid kept us apart for nearly 6 months. After he entered the Hospice Program I am able to be with him. Our adult children also visited in the last two weeks. Such a change since the Holidays!
  • Just this week it was time for him to make the next transition. His wonderful Nursing Staff gathered around me. They gently let me know that he requires much more care. It was time for him to move to the Skilled Nursing Care Unit. Now I have breakfast with him each day. I stay for an hour or so until he falls asleep. I’m so very grateful for all the wonderful nursing staff and the aides who are so kind. I know the care he is receiving is great so I worry less.

I learned three things about his disease:

  1. I didn’t cause it!
  2. I can’t change it!
  3. and I can’t cure it!

What I can do is accept that he has this awful disease, and love him through it all.

So how has less stress happened for me?

I had more difficulty with the transitions than he has. Eventually one of my friends suggested that I try rediscovering my art. She helped me rearrange the apartment, turning it into an artist studio. I started taking online art classes.

Gradually my passion for painting began to lift my spirits. My apartment now has paintings on nearly every available area of wall. I’m surrounded by color and beauty. I have little opportunity for worry.

Art saved me from a deep depression. One of my favorite hashtags in #artastherapy. For me it has certainly functioned that way. It’s amazing what bright colors will do.

Art may also be helpful for raising your spirits.

Pears, Grapes & Ginger Jar – 20D04

Posted on Categories:Paintings, SOLD, still life
COVID 19 Day 18 scaled
COVID 19 Day 18
Pears, Grapes & Ginger JarSOLD

COVID-19-day-18 Isolation has led me to frantically painting just to stay occupied. But from the looks of this Pears, Grapes & Ginger Jar painting, it’s agreeing with me!

The interesting side for me is that I’m actually getting used to not seeing anyone. That’s scary.

Here all my life I thought I was an extrovert, but NO.

COVID-19 has me doing a lot of thinking about how comfortable I am. So Introvert is really OK.

How are you all doing with staying at home, wearing a facemask when ever we’re outside, and all?

Grapefruit, Grapes & Plate : 18A15

Posted on Category:still life
18A15 Grapefruite Grapes Plate scaled
18A15 Grapefruite Grapes Plate
Grapefruit, Grapes & Plate 8×10 Oil on Canvas Panel $100 White dish with blue border, two oranges and a bunch of grapes This is one of my early paintings back in 2018 when I was first getting back to my art. When John went to the Assisted Living unit because I was no longer able to care for him. Art provided me with the perfect venue to prevent me slipping into a long funk that could lead to depression. The colors have kept me OK. In case you aren’t aware, my husband has Alzheimer’s and I have MS. You can learn more on the Home Page. I’m getting back to the blog. It’s been a while I know. John is now on hospice and I’ve been more involved with his care but it’s all from a socially responsible distance. We have not been able to actually be together in the same space since mid-March. It’s been quite a challenge. Also I’ve spent much of the rest of my time becoming more organized with my art. This should make it easier for me to publish photos and a bit of a short story about the paintings. I’m also more able to list the paintings in the Facebook Shop. I donate 10% of all my sales to research on Alzheimer’s and Multiple Sclerosis.

Cracked Egg #1 added

Posted on Categories:Paintings, still life
Cracked Egg #1

Cracked Egg painted

Is it an egg or a symbol of my broken dreams. I spent some time painting this afternoon.

2019 Gallery updated

After Cracked Egg #1 was complete, I added some photos to the 2019 gallery.

The new look of the website made this pretty simple. Now I encourage you all to check it out:

Click here: artbykarlene.org/paintings-gallery/

Can meditation lead to another level?

Posted on Categories:Paintings, Dennis Perrin, still life
Meditation on Oranges II 1 e1571084718965

The Perrin Method

Dennis Perrin encourages us to meditate prior to each session at the easel. As part of his classes he includes a special Artist Meditation to be done. I’m very quickly seeing why. Yesterday’s painting is making me a real believer!

Meditation on Oranges II

Meditation on Oranges II

TM (Transcendental Meditation) has been my way

John and I began doing TM about 15 years ago. That is a special form. Basically it’s 20 minutes of silence done twice a day, morning and evening. I use special Mantra to settle my mind and follow the breathe. Dennis’ is a guided combined with special music. It’s different but just as effective.

Meditation on Oranges I – How I met sunshine at the easel

Posted on Categories:Paintings, still life
Meditation on Oranges I

I awoke to listen to the Still Small Voice. It was so clear, calling me to meditation on my patio. It was one of those glorious early September days, the air was crisp and sky blue. As I settled images began to float by, some were colors without form, some forms with no colors. Simple compositions and so powerful.

Dennis Perrin – my latest teacher

For the last six months or so I’ve been looking at works by Dennis Perrin and really liking them. This weekend he held a Labor Day Sale and I just couldn’t resist. His style is still realistic, but it’s quite a bit looser than what I’ve been doing, This really appeals to me.

 I bit the bullet, checked my budget, and decided I could not, not get it. I opened his site and listened to a few of the demonstration videos. Do you have days when you can’t wait to get back to the easel? If so, you’ll recognize my excitement.

Meditation in the Perrin Method

There’s one special part of his ‘Perrin Method’ that I find appealing: He recommends beginning each painting session by meditating. It seems like he’s also been a long-time meditator, as have I. My days routinely begin and end with 20 minutes in silence. Although I haven’t mentioned it very often on this blog, here’s one time that I did: Back to Painting. Recently I re-worked that painting : Finally I feel Better about this Painting.But let’s move on.

Here’s my first foray into this exploration. I’ll try to combine my learning of color from Paul Foxton with this new information.  Instead of eating my breakfast oranges, I cut one opened and rushed to the easel. This is what emerged. I hope you enjoy it as much and I did painting it.

Meditation on Oranges I 

Meditation on Oranges I
Meditation on Oranges I